Advanced Oral Biology for Advanced Oral Care™

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Medications that cause dry mouth

medications-causing-dry-mouthThe U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently reported that 48.5 percent of the American public takes at least one prescription drug on a regular basis. The report went on to say that 21.7 percent of all Americans take three or more prescription medications, while 10.6 percent of the public takes more than five. As the prevalence of prescription drugs continues to rise, the number of people who suffer from the side effects also increases.

Dry mouth — or xerostomia — is one of the most common side effects associated with literally hundreds of different prescription and over-the-counter medications, in addition to numerous vitamins and dietary supplements. The main types of medications known to cause dry mouth include the following:

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Dental hygiene for cancer patients

dental-hygiene-for-cancerEvery day, dental professionals see a variety of patients with all different kinds of health issues and oral complications. Research shows that many systemic diseases have oral side effects that can potentially be life-threatening if treatment is not administered. A majority of patients, however, are unaware of this, and often underestimate the importance of maintaining good oral health.

One disease associated with serious oral health problems is the second leading cause of death in Americans today — cancer. It is estimated that up to 50 percent of all men, and one in three women will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their lifetime. This means that they will also have a significantly higher risk of developing oral disease due to the side effects of cancer therapy.

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How to spot and treat periodontitis

treating-periodontitisYou’ve no doubt heard of gingivitis -- the inflammation of the gums that occurs when plaque and tartar are allowed to build up for too long. In fact, dentists often warn patients that they need to keep brushing and flossing regularly to avoid gingivitis.


The problem here, is that although individuals know that gingivitis leads to puffy, red, sore, and receding gums, they think that it’s a minor problem that can be reversed at any stage with mouthwash and judiciously applied dental floss. Well, that’s true, but it’s only true up to a point. If you don’t make a habit of keeping your teeth clean and healthy, you’ll not only get cavities and develop gingivitis, but you’ll also run the risk of your gingivitis progressing to periodontitis.

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Gum disease bacteria can disarm the immune system

gum-disease-bacteriaNow that gum disease has become more prevalent in the United States and affects more than half of all American adults, an ever-growing amount of evidence is showing that gum disease is linked to a number of other serious diseases and health conditions, including type 2 diabetes, infertility, cancer, and more. Now, the results from a new study are showing exactly how gum disease bacteria affects the immune system.

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